Myth and Ritual in the contemporary world.
 ·      The motif for this subject is the myth of Arachne – who spins endless webs of significance. This subject invites you to come on a journey where together we weave a tapestry that reveals the ancient in the modern world of stories, places and practices.
·      Lectures begin with a very weird ancient ritual that is rather disgusting and seems to serve no purpose - but we will reveal its contemporary significance!
·      If you thought Kings Cross was just some place…you are invited to think again as you learn of the liminal space of the cross roads. Under the neon lights of the ritual Coco Cola sign we explore the dark depths. The cross roads were traditionally where criminals were hanged, vampires lurked, where blues musicians went to gain their musical powers by selling their soul to the devil, and where sacred Herms were placed for Hermes the messenger god who travelled to the underworld. Hermes is the base of the word Hermaphrodite and we explore the significance of the trans-sexual, transgender, cross-dresser in relation to the Greek god Dionysus, the Tantrik and Hindu god Shiva/Shakti and Les Girls performers. The cross-roads are the space of sex, drugs and rock n roll - and multiculturalism. I shall explore this motif through the TV series Underbelly: The Golden Mile.
·      Moby Dick is a classic story of the male hero quest. This lecture discusses masculine journeys and their significance in ritual practices – including those of contemporary academic practices of one year exchange or the method of ethnographic fieldwork. The lecture explores Moby Dick in relation to traditional whale hunters of Indonesia, the story of Jonah and the Whale, the fairytale of Pinocchio and the notion of the satan whale and monsters of the deep. It demonstrates the motif as a founding myth for the ritual of becoming a man and the importance of the liminal phase in this quest.
·      Alice in Wonderland is a  children’s story that has entered popular culture through numerous publications, films, Disney animation and songs – this repetition demonstrates that the story is a form of mythopeosis. Using examples popular culture the lecture unravels the myth and practice of the female journey at the heart of this tale. You will be guided through the myth of Psyche and Amor and shown how Alice/Psyche, is significant in contemporary theories including: embodied subjectivities,  écriture feminine, the phenomenology of ‘flesh’, and post-Jungian archetypal psychology. 
·      The Malay female vampire myth of Pontianak is considered in its cross-cultural and multicultural context. This myth is the most famous of South East Asia and has been the topic of numerous films and is a popular motif of blogs and youtube clips. The lecture explores this myth in relation to feminism and nature – interrupting the old Western dualistic paradigm. The film ‘Pontianak harum sundal malam’ will be viewed and then discussed in context of the phenomenology of the senses and sensuality.

Myth and Ritual in the contemporary world.

 ·      The motif for this subject is the myth of Arachne – who spins endless webs of significance. This subject invites you to come on a journey where together we weave a tapestry that reveals the ancient in the modern world of stories, places and practices.

·      Lectures begin with a very weird ancient ritual that is rather disgusting and seems to serve no purpose - but we will reveal its contemporary significance!

·      If you thought Kings Cross was just some place…you are invited to think again as you learn of the liminal space of the cross roads. Under the neon lights of the ritual Coco Cola sign we explore the dark depths. The cross roads were traditionally where criminals were hanged, vampires lurked, where blues musicians went to gain their musical powers by selling their soul to the devil, and where sacred Herms were placed for Hermes the messenger god who travelled to the underworld. Hermes is the base of the word Hermaphrodite and we explore the significance of the trans-sexual, transgender, cross-dresser in relation to the Greek god Dionysus, the Tantrik and Hindu god Shiva/Shakti and Les Girls performers. The cross-roads are the space of sex, drugs and rock n roll - and multiculturalism. I shall explore this motif through the TV series Underbelly: The Golden Mile.

·      Moby Dick is a classic story of the male hero quest. This lecture discusses masculine journeys and their significance in ritual practices – including those of contemporary academic practices of one year exchange or the method of ethnographic fieldwork. The lecture explores Moby Dick in relation to traditional whale hunters of Indonesia, the story of Jonah and the Whale, the fairytale of Pinocchio and the notion of the satan whale and monsters of the deep. It demonstrates the motif as a founding myth for the ritual of becoming a man and the importance of the liminal phase in this quest.

·      Alice in Wonderland is a  children’s story that has entered popular culture through numerous publications, films, Disney animation and songs – this repetition demonstrates that the story is a form of mythopeosis. Using examples popular culture the lecture unravels the myth and practice of the female journey at the heart of this tale. You will be guided through the myth of Psyche and Amor and shown how Alice/Psyche, is significant in contemporary theories including: embodied subjectivities,  écriture feminine, the phenomenology of ‘flesh’, and post-Jungian archetypal psychology.

·      The Malay female vampire myth of Pontianak is considered in its cross-cultural and multicultural context. This myth is the most famous of South East Asia and has been the topic of numerous films and is a popular motif of blogs and youtube clips. The lecture explores this myth in relation to feminism and nature – interrupting the old Western dualistic paradigm. The film ‘Pontianak harum sundal malam’ will be viewed and then discussed in context of the phenomenology of the senses and sensuality.

Myth and Ritual in the contemporary world.
 ·      The motif for this subject is the myth of Arachne – who spins endless webs of significance. This subject invites you to come on a journey where together we weave a tapestry that reveals the ancient in the modern world of stories, places and practices.
·      Lectures begin with a very weird ancient ritual that is rather disgusting and seems to serve no purpose - but we will reveal its contemporary significance!
·      If you thought Kings Cross was just some place…you are invited to think again as you learn of the liminal space of the cross roads. Under the neon lights of the ritual Coco Cola sign we explore the dark depths. The cross roads were traditionally where criminals were hanged, vampires lurked, where blues musicians went to gain their musical powers by selling their soul to the devil, and where sacred Herms were placed for Hermes the messenger god who travelled to the underworld. Hermes is the base of the word Hermaphrodite and we explore the significance of the trans-sexual, transgender, cross-dresser in relation to the Greek god Dionysus, the Tantrik and Hindu god Shiva/Shakti and Les Girls performers. The cross-roads are the space of sex, drugs and rock n roll - and multiculturalism. I shall explore this motif through the TV series Underbelly: The Golden Mile.
·      Moby Dick is a classic story of the male hero quest. This lecture discusses masculine journeys and their significance in ritual practices – including those of contemporary academic practices of one year exchange or the method of ethnographic fieldwork. The lecture explores Moby Dick in relation to traditional whale hunters of Indonesia, the story of Jonah and the Whale, the fairytale of Pinocchio and the notion of the satan whale and monsters of the deep. It demonstrates the motif as a founding myth for the ritual of becoming a man and the importance of the liminal phase in this quest.
·      Alice in Wonderland is a  children’s story that has entered popular culture through numerous publications, films, Disney animation and songs – this repetition demonstrates that the story is a form of mythopeosis. Using examples popular culture the lecture unravels the myth and practice of the female journey at the heart of this tale. You will be guided through the myth of Psyche and Amor and shown how Alice/Psyche, is significant in contemporary theories including: embodied subjectivities,  écriture feminine, the phenomenology of ‘flesh’, and post-Jungian archetypal psychology. 
·      The Malay female vampire myth of Pontianak is considered in its cross-cultural and multicultural context. This myth is the most famous of South East Asia and has been the topic of numerous films and is a popular motif of blogs and youtube clips. The lecture explores this myth in relation to feminism and nature – interrupting the old Western dualistic paradigm. The film ‘Pontianak harum sundal malam’ will be viewed and then discussed in context of the phenomenology of the senses and sensuality.

Myth and Ritual in the contemporary world.

 ·      The motif for this subject is the myth of Arachne – who spins endless webs of significance. This subject invites you to come on a journey where together we weave a tapestry that reveals the ancient in the modern world of stories, places and practices.

·      Lectures begin with a very weird ancient ritual that is rather disgusting and seems to serve no purpose - but we will reveal its contemporary significance!

·      If you thought Kings Cross was just some place…you are invited to think again as you learn of the liminal space of the cross roads. Under the neon lights of the ritual Coco Cola sign we explore the dark depths. The cross roads were traditionally where criminals were hanged, vampires lurked, where blues musicians went to gain their musical powers by selling their soul to the devil, and where sacred Herms were placed for Hermes the messenger god who travelled to the underworld. Hermes is the base of the word Hermaphrodite and we explore the significance of the trans-sexual, transgender, cross-dresser in relation to the Greek god Dionysus, the Tantrik and Hindu god Shiva/Shakti and Les Girls performers. The cross-roads are the space of sex, drugs and rock n roll - and multiculturalism. I shall explore this motif through the TV series Underbelly: The Golden Mile.

·      Moby Dick is a classic story of the male hero quest. This lecture discusses masculine journeys and their significance in ritual practices – including those of contemporary academic practices of one year exchange or the method of ethnographic fieldwork. The lecture explores Moby Dick in relation to traditional whale hunters of Indonesia, the story of Jonah and the Whale, the fairytale of Pinocchio and the notion of the satan whale and monsters of the deep. It demonstrates the motif as a founding myth for the ritual of becoming a man and the importance of the liminal phase in this quest.

·      Alice in Wonderland is a  children’s story that has entered popular culture through numerous publications, films, Disney animation and songs – this repetition demonstrates that the story is a form of mythopeosis. Using examples popular culture the lecture unravels the myth and practice of the female journey at the heart of this tale. You will be guided through the myth of Psyche and Amor and shown how Alice/Psyche, is significant in contemporary theories including: embodied subjectivities,  écriture feminine, the phenomenology of ‘flesh’, and post-Jungian archetypal psychology.

·      The Malay female vampire myth of Pontianak is considered in its cross-cultural and multicultural context. This myth is the most famous of South East Asia and has been the topic of numerous films and is a popular motif of blogs and youtube clips. The lecture explores this myth in relation to feminism and nature – interrupting the old Western dualistic paradigm. The film ‘Pontianak harum sundal malam’ will be viewed and then discussed in context of the phenomenology of the senses and sensuality.

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About:

Dr Anita Lundberg's interdisciplinary interests are informed by theories of relationality. She researches relations between, human, natural, animal, material and virtual cultures. Her work has been published, performed and exhibited in Australia, Asia, USA, UK and Europe. She is interested in both the microcosmic of the everyday and the macrocosmic of global networks - and the intersection of these.

Anita's teaching philosophy is to encourage creative learning through interactive lectures, tutorials and blended learning sites that buzz. Her subjects are designed with embedded learning skills and to explore innovative uses of new technologies that are relevant to the subject.

Anita works in collaboration with other lecturers, librarians, learning advisers, media and industry partners to bring students an integrated study experience that moves between everyday life, global understanding and theoretical exploration.

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